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Horror Writing and Alex Grecian

A guide to Pantsing_Edited

It’s been a fantastic journey so far working through my horror short stories. I must admit that it takes a special kind of mindset to write horror more than it takes to read it. Reading allows you to experience the horror from a receptive perspective. Writing puts you not only in the killers mind as the contributor, but also the victim’s body as the recipient and through each affected body part as the subject of the pain. As a visual person, my mind doesn’t just spew out the experiences of my writing without some reaction, but it affects my actual body parts – not literally of course but it sure feels that way.

The amazing thing about the writing, is how the writing has been intuitive rather than guided. It’s pantsing at its best. Discovery writing into oblivion. However, unlike a lot of my previous work when I’ve been flying by the seat of my pants, each of my stories seem like well thought out works. There’s barely any plot holes and everything just makes sense. I love it!

Looking forward to writing the remaining 8 short stories left. Who knows what the mind will come up with? Here is an interesting interview of Monday’s Book recommendation author – Alex Grecian:

 

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About Nthato Morakabi

Nthato Morakabi is a South African published author. He has short stories appearing in both international and local anthologies, and has published his first book, Beneath the Wax, which opens his three-part novella series "Wax". He is an avid reader, blogger and writer.

5 responses »

  1. It’s kind of like mystery. When I write my stories I have to know exactly what’s going on, but write from a perspective who has no idea what’s going on. I have to know the who, what, when, where, why, and how. And being a series, it’s a lot to take in and remember. I can only imagine what horror is like to write. But it’s definitely frustrating and satisfying at the same time.

    Reply
    • That does sound really frustrating and satisfying. I actually don’t have the who, what, when, where, why, and how… but at the end of the story it looks like I did all along. It’s a pleasant surprise when my editing isn’t changing the story so much as fixing grammar and those kinds of errors. Mystery sounds like a really fun genre to write, but I don’t know if I can pull it off.

      Reply
  2. I have a history major I want to have view this video. How much you wanna’ bet the author interviewed was a history major?

    Reply

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